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The Archbishop Mansion

Located in San Francisco

This prominent landmarked residence of imposing size is known as the “Archbishop Mansion” because it was built in 1904 as the home of the Archbishop of San Francisco. It has been extensively and expensively restored. The exterior reflects the understated elegance of the French Second Empire
The building is located on the NW corner of Alamo Square Park, an attractive, well maintained urban park with 100 year old trees, large lawns, tennis courts, a children’s play area, and views of the “Painted Ladies” with the City skyline behind them. This area is near the Opera House, Symphony Hall and City Hall. It is walking distance to the restaurants and shops of Hayes Valley and NOPA/Divisadero.

First Floor: A wide exterior stairway leads to an oak paneled entry with double glass front doors and side windows. These open into a large paneled foyer with a coffered ceiling. To the right is the parlor with a hand painted vaulted ceiling and fireplace. To the left is a smaller “receiving room” and a large room used as an office.

Through a tall archway with two etched glass side panels is the colonnaded central hall with a dramatic three-story staircase topped by an extraordinary 12 foot oval stained glass skylight.

This grand hall leads to the right into an elegant formal dining room with redwood paneling, coffered ceilings, bay window, elaborate built-in serving cabinet and a fireplace. Down the hall to the left is a self-contained suite which includes a sitting room with fireplace, a bedroom and bath.

Behind the dining room is a butler’s pantry with a commercial dishwasher and built-in cabinets. This leads to a huge kitchen recently remodeled featuring granite and stainless steel counters, a large center island, Wolfe and Sub Zero appliances and glass fronted cabinets. Off the kitchen is a sunny breakfast room. There are two large walk-in pantries. A back hallway leads to a half bath, the rear staircase which serves all four floors, and a small suite.
  • The ground floor ceilings are 12 feet high.
  • There is an elevator to all four floors.
  • The Second Floor has a wide hall around the open staircase. On this floor are a
    large living room, a media room, a library, and four bedrooms with bathrooms.
    The second floor ceilings are 11 feet high.
  • The Third Floor has seven bedrooms with baths. Six of these also have a fireplace. One of these is a two-room suite and another is the former ballroom.
  • The third floor ceilings are 10 feet high.
  • Views: All of the main rooms have views of Alamo Square Park.
  • The Lower Ground Floor: A wide staircase leads from the main hall down to a large billiards room accented by coffered ceilings, a bay window, and a fireplace. There is a huge open studio plus an office alcove. Also on this level are two half baths, a large laundry room, boiler room, heater room and two additional finished rooms. This floor which has excellent window areas is partly to entirely above grade. The ceilings in the main rooms are 10 feet high.
  • Parking lot for six unobstructed cars and up ten cars with tandem parking.
  • Overview:
    • Three main floors 15,394 sq. ft.

    • Lower ground floor 5,346 sq. ft.

    • Total 20,740 sq. ft.


HISTORY OF THE ARCHBISHOP’S MANSION

The mansion was built in 1904 as the residence of the second Archbishop of San Francisco, Patrick Riordan, in Alamo Square, then the most fashionable neighborhood in San Francisco. The architect was Frank Shea. Mr. Shea designed several projects for Archbishop Riordan including St. Vincent de Paul’s on Steiner Street and Holy Cross on Eddy Street.

The building is designed in the style of the French Second Empire (1884 to 1914). The mansion has a wood frame and a steel reinforced foundation. Most of the wood in the mansion is redwood that was brought from the redwood groves in the Santa Cruz Mountains. The staircase is mahogany.

Archbishop Riordan came to San Francisco from Chicago in 1882 when the city’s population was predominantly Catholic. He was very influential in the development of the city from a gold rush town to a modern center of social, religious and commercial activity. He was involved in building churches, schools, convents and hospitals throughout the Bay Area. He lived in the mansion from 1904 until 1915. Archbishop Edward Hanna lived in the mansion between 1915 and 1935. Archbishop John Mitty lived there between 1935 and 1944.

In 1944 the Archbishop moved to a smaller residence in Pacific Heights. The Archdiocese kept the mansion and made it into a Working Boys’ home for Catholic youth. The boys lived in the mansion, went to school in the mornings and worked at a job in the afternoons. In 1972 the mansion was sold to a private owner and leased to a medical center that sponsored a counseling program called Westside Lodge.

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Status: Sold
13 Bed  |  14 Baths
Sold: $7,000,000
List: $7,950,000
20,000 Sq. Ft.

The Archbishop Mansion

Located in San Francisco

This prominent landmarked residence of imposing size is known as the “Archbishop Mansion” because it was built in 1904 as the home of the Archbishop of San Francisco. It has been extensively and expensively restored. The exterior reflects the understated elegance of the French Second Empire
The building is located on the NW corner of Alamo Square Park, an attractive, well maintained urban park with 100 year old trees, large lawns, tennis courts, a children’s play area, and views of the “Painted Ladies” with the City skyline behind them. This area is near the Opera House, Symphony Hall and City Hall. It is walking distance to the restaurants and shops of Hayes Valley and NOPA/Divisadero.

First Floor: A wide exterior stairway leads to an oak paneled entry with double glass front doors and side windows. These open into a large paneled foyer with a coffered ceiling. To the right is the parlor with a hand painted vaulted ceiling and fireplace. To the left is a smaller “receiving room” and a large room used as an office.

Through a tall archway with two etched glass side panels is the colonnaded central hall with a dramatic three-story staircase topped by an extraordinary 12 foot oval stained glass skylight.

This grand hall leads to the right into an elegant formal dining room with redwood paneling, coffered ceilings, bay window, elaborate built-in serving cabinet and a fireplace. Down the hall to the left is a self-contained suite which includes a sitting room with fireplace, a bedroom and bath.

Behind the dining room is a butler’s pantry with a commercial dishwasher and built-in cabinets. This leads to a huge kitchen recently remodeled featuring granite and stainless steel counters, a large center island, Wolfe and Sub Zero appliances and glass fronted cabinets. Off the kitchen is a sunny breakfast room. There are two large walk-in pantries. A back hallway leads to a half bath, the rear staircase which serves all four floors, and a small suite.
  • The ground floor ceilings are 12 feet high.
  • There is an elevator to all four floors.
  • The Second Floor has a wide hall around the open staircase. On this floor are a
    large living room, a media room, a library, and four bedrooms with bathrooms.
    The second floor ceilings are 11 feet high.
  • The Third Floor has seven bedrooms with baths. Six of these also have a fireplace. One of these is a two-room suite and another is the former ballroom.
  • The third floor ceilings are 10 feet high.
  • Views: All of the main rooms have views of Alamo Square Park.
  • The Lower Ground Floor: A wide staircase leads from the main hall down to a large billiards room accented by coffered ceilings, a bay window, and a fireplace. There is a huge open studio plus an office alcove. Also on this level are two half baths, a large laundry room, boiler room, heater room and two additional finished rooms. This floor which has excellent window areas is partly to entirely above grade. The ceilings in the main rooms are 10 feet high.
  • Parking lot for six unobstructed cars and up ten cars with tandem parking.
  • Overview:
    • Three main floors 15,394 sq. ft.

    • Lower ground floor 5,346 sq. ft.

    • Total 20,740 sq. ft.


HISTORY OF THE ARCHBISHOP’S MANSION

The mansion was built in 1904 as the residence of the second Archbishop of San Francisco, Patrick Riordan, in Alamo Square, then the most fashionable neighborhood in San Francisco. The architect was Frank Shea. Mr. Shea designed several projects for Archbishop Riordan including St. Vincent de Paul’s on Steiner Street and Holy Cross on Eddy Street.

The building is designed in the style of the French Second Empire (1884 to 1914). The mansion has a wood frame and a steel reinforced foundation. Most of the wood in the mansion is redwood that was brought from the redwood groves in the Santa Cruz Mountains. The staircase is mahogany.

Archbishop Riordan came to San Francisco from Chicago in 1882 when the city’s population was predominantly Catholic. He was very influential in the development of the city from a gold rush town to a modern center of social, religious and commercial activity. He was involved in building churches, schools, convents and hospitals throughout the Bay Area. He lived in the mansion from 1904 until 1915. Archbishop Edward Hanna lived in the mansion between 1915 and 1935. Archbishop John Mitty lived there between 1935 and 1944.

In 1944 the Archbishop moved to a smaller residence in Pacific Heights. The Archdiocese kept the mansion and made it into a Working Boys’ home for Catholic youth. The boys lived in the mansion, went to school in the mornings and worked at a job in the afternoons. In 1972 the mansion was sold to a private owner and leased to a medical center that sponsored a counseling program called Westside Lodge.

Read More
Dona Crowder

Dona Crowder

Direct: 415.310.5933